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At a time when our country needs real investments in infrastructure, education and public services, congressional leaders 

No politician running for office today would openly advocate for more wealth inequality in our country, where the richest 1 percent of the population owns 40 percent of the wealth. Even candidate Donald Trump in 2016 promised to stand up for the “forgotten men and women of our country,” who feel betrayed by a rigged economic system that benefits a small minority at their expense. Yet every single day, President Trump and congressional leaders seem determined to do more to increase wealth inequality than to alleviate it; do more for corporations and the wealthy than for single parents working two or three jobs to make ends meet.

Like others around the world, I mourned the death last week of Aretha Franklin. The Queen of Soul set a new standard for enduring classic songs with both artistic and political impact, like her mega-hit “Respect,” which became an anthem for both the civil rights and women’s movements.

And that song is on my mind as we embark on a week of action dedicated to shining light on the stakes for women in the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court.

AFSCME members are joining PEOPLE to help fight the powerful forces trying to silence workers.
The Board unanimously endorsed Tim Walz and Peggy Flanagan for Governor and Lieutenant Governor in the November election.

The Janus case was an attempt to deliver a knockout blow to millions of working people and their families who looked to the Supreme Court as an independent institution that advances equal rights and fundamental freedoms for all.

On the heels of high profile walkouts, new organizing and spiking approval for unions, union leaders see the SCOTUS decision as a rallying point to unrig the economy and put workers first.

Imagine looking around a room full of supervisors and fellow AFSCME members, knowing you’re about to speak publicly and share an emotional story.

The management negotiations team sits poker-faced.

And to raise the stakes even higher, your story could lead to a contract with better benefits and working conditions for everyone.

When he first took a job at the Centralia Correctional Center in Illinois, Keith Kracht knew that a career in public service wouldn’t make him a millionaire. But then again, that’s not why he went into public service.